CONNECTING THE DOTS: SEXUAL REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND CIVIC PARTICIPATION FOR SOCIAL CHANGE – DAY 2 – McKelvin Jude Oseh

CONNECTING THE DOTS: SEXUAL REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND CIVIC PARTICIPATION FOR SOCIAL CHANGE – DAY 2 – McKelvin Jude Oseh

Step by Step, the longest match
Can be won, can be one
Many Stones do form an arch
Singly none, singly none
Drops of water make a meal
Singly none, singly none

And by union, what we will
Can be accomplished still
Step by step, the longest match,
Can be won, can be one.

Beautiful poem led by Dr. Stella serenaded the opening session of the day, step by step the longest match can indeed be won.

The day’s first session was centered around ‘Value clarification’ facilitated by Mrs. Ngozi, who reiterated the principles, standards or quality that individuals or groups of people hold in high regards; a further clarification was beamed on understanding where values came from, clearly some of which are from the Family, Peer (social influences), at the work place, educational institutes and religion. This session revealed experiences of participants and how they overcame them on the conflicts between their values and institutions they represent. Conclusively the presentation revealed cases to which Individuals upheld their values against an institutional value to which they owe an obligatory response to uphold. However, individuals must learn, understand and separate their personal values against institutional values.

An interesting finding where revealed during the second session – ADOLESCENT (SRHR) ISSUES facilitated by Dr. Stella, whose presentation was centered around transformatory experiences throughout the pubertal phase of adolescents.

The Pubertal phase of life comes with a lot of transformation most especially hormonal changes and sexuality and sexual discoveries. However, families deprive their wards the opportunity to information and education about changes that happens during the pubertal phase. However, some of the adolescent SRHR issues usually results to the following, which includes, Child early and forced marriage, Teenage Pregnancies, harmful practice ‘Female genital mutilation’ (FGM), STDs/STI’s, unsafe abortion, maternal mortality, Incest / Vulnerability to HIV and in other cases VVF.

Strategies for Programming for Adolescents includes:

Personal empowerment and development
Leadership Skills
Support Services
Capacity development
Advocacy

To mitigate some of these issues, the following approach should be considered

Partnerships/Collaborations between individuals, guardians, CSO’s and policy makers
Behavioral Change and Communications
Research and Resource mobilization must be encouraged.

Furtherance to the conclusive session facilitated by Mrs, Dorothy on DDM (Define, Difference and Meaning), emphasized that the society has been constrained to think and act in certain ways to be pro-normal, forgetting sometimes variety is the spice of life, this includes sexuality, a sensitive subject mostly being discussed in isolation and marginalized and even criminalized. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses: Sex and sex roles, Gender Identities and roles, Sexual orientation, Eroticism, Pleasure, Intimacy, Reproduction and Values.

During this session, participants were exposed to the Definitions, Difference and Meaning of diverse aspects of sexuality beaming on societal norms, spirituality, family, hormonal changes, genetics, and more.

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